New Futures for Birmingham`s Historic Buildings

A Peaky Blinding stroll around Bordesley

Posted September 22nd, 2013 by Joe Turner with 105 Comments

The big budget new BBC2 TV show Peaky Blinders, set in Birmingham after the First World War and focusing on a fearsome criminal gang in the Small Heath and Bordesley area, is currently creating what I understand media people call a ‘buzz’.

The first episode, right from the moody Nick Cave title music and Cillian Murphy’s horse bound entrance as gang leader Tommy Shelby, painted a dazzlingly atmospheric, if pretty grim, picture of East Birmingham in 1919. It was also littered with local references: BSA and the Austin, a walk down ‘the cut’ to Greet, the Italian colony around Park Street, St Andrews Football Ground.

Pedants may point to a certain artistic licence over historical accuracy and some of the accents may grate on speakers of modern day Brummie, but personally I think this misses the point and it’s great to see something so exciting on primetime TV mythologising our home city. But seemingly very little of the series was shot in the city, partly because the makers say that there was not enough old streets left.

     Bordesley station and viaduct

There is a lot of interesting stuff out there on the real story of the Peaky Blinders (see for example Carl Chinn here and Philip Gooderson’s The Gangs of Birmingham) but I wondered how much of the Bordesley that the Shelbys might have inhabited still exists. And was it really all that bad? So, on my way to watch Blues vs. Sheffield Wednesday at St Andrew’s (one thing that hasn’t changed since 1919 – Birmingham City have played at St Andrew’s since 1906) I thought I would take a closer look…

              Works on Floodgate Street; former public convenience, Great Barr Street; The Rainbow, Bordesley High Street

As might be expected, the area has changed significantly. As in Digbeth and Deritend, much of the older housing was demolished as part of slum clearance programmes, and later to make way for Bordesley Village. The Shelby’s fictional HQ was on Watery Lane, which is long gone as a result of Manzoni’s Middle Ring Road being driven through the area, though the name survives as Watery Lane Middleway.

                      Former Canal Office, Fazeley Street; Watery Lane Middleway crossing canal; roving canal bridge

Some fine buildings have been lost. For example, the Grade II listed former Queen’s Head pub (later called The Inn Place), which occupied an isolated spot on the corner of Garrison and Midland Streets, hemmed in by three railways and a canal is now completely demolished. However, much still remains, including some impressive municipal and community buildings, the network of canals and railways, and several pubs.

                     The Garrison pub, Garrison Lane; old Corporation Baths, Lower Dartmouth Street; Sportsman pub, Garrison Lane

The fictional Garrison Tavern is the Peaky Blinders’ local. The real one still stands in a run of impressive buildings including the former Garrison Lane Nursery School and the attached caretaker’s house. Several other pubs of the era are also still around, including the Sportsman and Royal George just up the road, the Wagon & Horses on Adderley Street, and the Rainbow on Bordesley High Street. Unfortunately, the Clements Arms, on Coventry Road / Lower Trinity Street, is currently boarded up and looking in a poor state of repair.

             Martin & Chamberlain Victorian board schools

                   The old chapel and Sunday school, Fazeley Street

A striking feature is the number of buildings that are a result of Victorian and Edwardian improvement. There are several beautiful former board schools including those at Garrison Lane, Ada Road, Tilton Road and Dixon Road. The former ‘cottage baths’ on Lower Dartmouth Street opened at the dawning of the First World War. At the south end of Fazeley Street are the former Sunday school and chapel, and round the corner the St Basil’s Centre, Built as the church of St John and St Basil, 1910, by Arthur S Dixon. Further east, at Bordesley Green, is the Ideal Village, one of the first such developments in England. It was built by Raymond Unwin and Barry Parker before between 1908 and 1914, where they tested ideas later to come to fruition at Letchworth and Hamstead Garden Suburb. So, who knows, maybe the area wasn’t quite as grim as the TV show implies?!

All in all, an interesting walk, topped off by a pint in the Sportsman, a 4-1 win for Blues and no sign of any Peakies. The only problem is, I now have quite a circuitous lucky route to the match. Although perhaps next time, I will repeat the exercise in Small Heath…

105 Responses to “A Peaky Blinding stroll around Bordesley”

  1. Amy November 12, 2016

    Just discovered my Grandfather emigrated from England due to worries he and or his cousins would get involved with the gangs. Anyone remember the Shickles? Lived there until early 1920’s. An uncle owned a pub is my understanding

    Reply

    • Mike January 25, 2017

      Dear Amy: I have been looking into the history of the Shickle family. Which branch of the family do you belong to, and where did you hear about the gangs bit?
      Mike

      Reply

  2. Peter Wright September 24, 2016

    Any one who lived in Miles street Bordesley Birmingham?

    Reply

  3. peter albert treen September 22, 2016

    cant believe what i hhave read here, my dad was Edward Fredrik Teen from cooksy road born 1912, his dad was a tram driver, dad had 2 sisters maude and i think ellsie? he maried a girl from stoke on trent Dorethy, and lived in diferent houses throuhg the war, i was born in 1944, 1 year befor the end, at 116 green lane, and my god mother and farther glladys and gorge medows lived next door 118 green lane, throughout the war dad was a plumber fitter at the bsa, he worked permanent nights but his boss said ted go on days for a bit and have time wwith the wife an kids, that night dad at home and the bsa was hit, flat i was told when older, my dad would never talk about it, never, my mom told me that night they decided to go down into the celler and not the shelter out back, very heavey bombing , the shelter got hit, the house was shaking she said, morning came and when they try to go out the back there was a very big bomb stiking out the ground were the kitchen was, but never exploded, but she always said what a great crod of people they were there in small heath, every thing looked better after a cup of tea, we were moved to pollard rd,. acocks green after that, ,

    Reply

  4. Maisie Ellis August 12, 2016

    I wonder if any one remembers my grand parents Edward and Alice Jones who lived in Parliament st mothers name was Emily I was born in there front room in 19 36 then lived in cooksey rd which was bombed in the war

    Reply

  5. Mary standley /Glastonbury July 7, 2016

    Hi Ray.
    My sister told me she used to spend time with your wife and her sister Susan.did they have a brother too.
    Your sister Susan went to school with me.
    I remember you have a brother Peter I used to drink in the garrison with his girlfriend and my ex.
    You also had a brother Graham.
    Do you remember the galliots and Michael Truman. Also the Powell’s.
    The Irish family the folans lived at the top of Gordon street we all seemed to know so many families those days.
    People don’t know how good the 50s and 60s were such a nice place to live.
    Mary.

    Reply

    • Ray July 8, 2016

      Mary, you are right, Margaret has a Brother, Brian. Peter used to drink in the Garrison with our Dad. My Sisters name by the way is Christine, Susan as you said is Margarets Sister.

      The names you mention are familiar, although after so long I am having difficulty placing them.

      I must admit that I have fond memories of living around Garrison Lane, even to the extent of taking Margaret & 2 of our Grandchildren around the area to show them where we both lived and went to school.

      Reply

  6. Mary standley /Glastonbury July 5, 2016

    Ray.
    Think I’ve got you would you be Moore and your wife Coles
    If I am right remember you if not what are your surnames

    Reply

    • Ray July 5, 2016

      Mary, yes you have the correct surnames.

      Reply

    • Maureen marlowe November 28, 2016

      I lived in sarha street in the early sixties I used the garrison pub I married Keith standley of artilary St Loved the area used to play as a child in the park opposite the pub those where the days

      Reply

  7. Mary standley /Glastonbury July 4, 2016

    Hi Ray.
    Yes I did marry a standley Arthur.
    And divorced almost 30 years ago
    I also remember JFKs death but not as much as my sister Carol who was older.
    Ray where were you living at the time.
    I think I remember you but the age of 62 it was a long time ago.
    I think they are doing the garrison up as last time I passed it had scaffold up
    I do hope so as I was born there and hate to think it would be demolished.
    It’s my only claim to game.
    Regards Mary

    Reply

    • Ray July 5, 2016

      Mary, I lived in Gordon Street and my wife, Margaret lived in Artillery Street. We both went to Garrison Lane Infants, Tilton Rd Junior and then me to St. Andrews Boys and Margaret to Tilton Road Girls. I left school in 1964 and Margaret the year after in 1965, having stayed on in the 5th year.

      Reply

    • Maureen marlowe November 28, 2016

      I notice there is another lady who married a standley from artillery street

      Reply

  8. Mary standley /Glastonbury June 25, 2016

    Hi sian.
    My dad Fredrick did have a sister called lillian she was married to arch and they had three children Vincent Leah and Roy they were Reilly. Roy was a coalman
    Known as kenning and Reilly
    My dad had lillian sister brother Albert and brother Harry.
    If you need any more info let me know.
    Mary

    Reply

    • Ray July 4, 2016

      Mary, I am being a little nosey here but did marry one of the Standleys who lived in Artillery Street. I was talking to my wife the other day about our childhood and we remember the family.
      She also remembers being at the Garrison on the day John F Kennedy was assassinated in the USA, not drinking I hasten to add as she was only 15 at the time.

      Reply

  9. Jo Dugmore June 17, 2016

    I am seeking anyone who has knowledge of a Neville Collins, known to have lived at 188 Charles Street, Small Heath around 1960’s. I would be grateful of any news. My family lived in the area for many years and I have found memories of back to back housing and Anderson shelters, left after World War II.

    Reply

  10. bob lees June 14, 2016

    hello – I have a picture of my grandad taken outside the ‘ Albert Thorne’ pub, an Ansells pub. The ‘regulars’ are all lined up outside – including the barman – taken about 1920 – does anyone know where that pub was maybe Unit street – I’m from Lozells – it could be round Hockley Brook somewhere. My uncle Eddie Cutler ran the ‘White Swan’ in town – an old bloke used to come in that everyone deferred to – he was known as ‘old Joe Kimber’ is he the Kimber of the peakies fame [ which is mostly bullshit by the way] my cousin was Johnny Prescott – anybody know [knew] that crew- cheers

    Reply

  11. Sheila Shanley April 25, 2016

    My Parents lived in Small Heath, Birmingham in 1940’s – I know this is a long shot, but does anyone remember them? Mother: Kathleen “Kay” Glennon, born Dublin 1916, she worked as a Waitress in Birmingham, may have lived at Charles Road, Small Heath with Mrs Barbara Clayton; and 11a Park Hill, Moseley in a Flat. Had 3 children: Barbara, Michael and myself, Sheila. Left Birmingham 1951. My Father: Frederick Fitzsimons, born County Meath, Ireland 1921, may have worked as a Bus Conductor, but not certain of this. As far as I know he and my Mother never married. He returned to Ireland around 1949 or 1950. I am trying to piece their lives together, as there is no one left to answer my questions. Any help would be very much appreciated. (Mum spent 10 months in Dudley Road Hospital Infirmary after my Birth, as we were both very ill, so maybe someone who was in hospital with her may remember, or any of the staff from that time.) It would mean a great deal to me to solve a few mysteries. Many thanks.

    Reply

  12. barbara Priest March 29, 2016

    I am trying to find out about my Dad,Albert Haynes,he was born 1/03/1909 at 109 Palace Road, Small Heath and attended Little Green Lane School he went on to work at the gas works .His Moms maiden name was Sarah Jane Rose and his Dad was John Haynes , he had a brother Arther and a sister Rose.He moved to Sheldon in 1938 when he married my Mom Winifred Hassall from Kingsheath.I would be so gratefull for any imformation about my Dad or any of his extended family as i keep hitting brick walls.Barbara

    Reply

  13. Deb Reynolds March 3, 2016

    What a fascinating blog. Just stumbled across it while surfing net for stuff. I myself spent many hours playing in Garrison Park during the 70’s. I didn’t live in the area but my Mom ran the High Stool Café situated on Watery Lane from around 1970 – 1980 when it was demolished to widen the road. The site where it stood is now occupied by Halfords. My Dad had a scrap yard opposite Cannings Factory and I remember there was a small shop that sold papers and biscuits. Also there was a haberdashery shop on the corner of I think little barr street. Quite often I would walk down Tilton road after getting off the bus on Kingston Hill. If I remember there was an old picture house that was turned into a bingo hall? My dad was born in Palmer Street flats and I know that my Grandad and great uncles were born around there and brought up in the area. My great uncle Tommy committed suicide by jumping from the canal bridge on Garrison Lane (so I’m told) My granddad was born in the late 1800’s early 1900’s so maybe he was around there at the time of the Peaky Blinders. My Dad was born in 1924 but sadly died in 1971 so unable to give me any details of how life was for him as I was only 9 at that time. My family name was Sansom.

    Reply

  14. Mary Standley /glastonbury December 30, 2015

    Ray.
    I agree with you as my mom and dad kept the Garrison from the 50s to the mid 60s.
    The people were proud people never asked for hand outs worked hard in very hard jobs.
    Every Sunday wore the Sunday best. The steps were all scrubbed and the pavements washed Monday was wash day in the back to back houses and the washing done by hand in the wash house. The washing was spotless
    Loved the ladies.
    All made a fuss of us kids gave you what they had even though they didn’t have much.
    Proud to be from Garrison lane
    Mary

    Reply

  15. sandra ybert December 28, 2015

    garrison lane was a dirty filthy place to live in the 1950s my step grt gand mother still lived there then
    mrs Sherlock her house was dark inside and every one had a tin bath hooked onto the wall out side there front doors , it must have been a status simble to have a tin bath
    although they came from the lowest of the low they never swore I never heard my grand parents say a nasty word

    Reply

    • Ray December 28, 2015

      Sandra, I do not think that Garrison Lane was a “dirty, filthy place to live” in the 1950s, it was no better or worse than plenty of other areas in Birmingham, it has to be remembered that the country was still getting over the war years and life was tough. The people around the area were proud and though the houses by and large did need to be pulled down, they were doing there best to maintain some semblance of dignity.

      Reply

    • peter round February 27, 2016

      Hello Sandra
      I’m proud of Garrison Lane .I live in the flats, some of my mates who live in the lane & from the flats we used go down to the canal know has the cut we swim in the cut for hour’s.
      My wife and I we are proud where we came from.
      peter round

      Reply

  16. Mary Standley /glastonbury December 17, 2015

    Hi carole,
    Lovely to know Teresa and pauline
    Keep in touch,
    I would love to meet up after Christmas
    It is a bit hectic in the silly season
    And working in London it’s awful
    The Garrison tavern has scaffolding around it
    I hope it’s being done up as the pub I was bought up in and not being pulled down will keep an eye on it in the next few weeks.
    Have a great Christmas and good new
    Year.
    Can’t wait to catch up
    Mary

    Reply

  17. Carole field December 15, 2015

    Mary twins said to say hello just now. Been in touch with Teresa. And a Merry Christmas to you too.
    Carole

    Reply

  18. Mary Standley /glastonbury December 8, 2015

    Hi carole
    To meet up would be great live near hunters moon just let me know day and time.
    Mary

    Reply

    • Carole field December 15, 2015

      Hi Mary
      Know the location well. Bit tight this side of Christmas but we could get together after the festivities. Will keep in touch with through this site and look forward to seeing you soon. Carole

      Reply

  19. Mary Standley /glastonbury November 2, 2015

    Hi carole.
    Nice to hear all the news about the girls.
    It’s was Colin and he married sue batts
    Who was in our class too. They live in Devon.
    So great to hear where everyone is in the world.
    I am in hodge hill area.
    The art teachers where miss hyatt
    And miss Williams.
    Pat was the one I taught to run.
    Cathy the twins and me spent alot of time at the twins house.
    The Garrison is still boarded up just hope they don’t pull it down.
    Did you go to the juniors of tilton I loved Mr Turner made me the runner l should of been.
    Are you in the area still as everyone is so far away thanks for the update on the whereabouts of the class. I meet Debbie when she was married to a friend of mines brother but that was in the mid 70s it must be 45 years or more since we all saw each other.
    So great to hear
    Thanks Mary

    Reply

    • Carole field November 22, 2015

      Hi Mary
      Yes I attended infants and juniors with you. Mr Wildgoose was our headmaster in junior school and yes Dick Turmer was deputy head. I remember you running very well and how Dick Turner coach you, you were fast. Do you recall Mr Wadsworth who occupied one of the classrooms on the top playground his room always fascinated me pictures all over the walls and on the ceiling. I contacted and met up in their homes both Dick Turner and Mr Wadsworth. They has loads of old photos which they allowed me to look through. Kept a load of them too with their approval. Would be good to meet up to talk further. I live in Blum still but moving to Wales soon. Perhaps we could arrange something. Carole

      Reply

  20. Mary Standley /glastonbury October 28, 2015

    Hi carole.
    You may remember me my mom kept the Garrison tavern in the 50s to the 60s I was at Garrison lane school great little school and then on to tilton rd school for girls with miss harding as our head.
    I have live in the area all my life the apple never falls far from the tree.
    The life style was hard but great loved living in the Garrison alot of things in there dated back to the tv show.
    The street I grew up the mothers watch us play till it went dark and we all played together.
    Such a great time.
    I was at school with Debby hickin the twins Teresa and pauline and cathy wade to name just a few.
    Miss bowden was our teacher.
    Great times nice to know you still OK.
    Mary

    Reply

    • Carole field October 31, 2015

      Wow of course I remember you Mary I use to come to your house a lot to play music. I remember the guy I think he lived next door to you, was it Colin who use to join us. Lots to tell you. Been in touch with Deborah Hickin, Barbara Thompson, Pat Price who now lives in Canada and the twins who live in Guernsey. Seen them all, in particular the twins. I have visited them at their place in France and seen Pat several times when she has visited Birmingham. The twins have just met up with Cathy wade too. The first time the twins came over we were lucky enough to get access to Tilton road school after the major refurb. What a great experience that was for us all. So many happy memories it was amazing how many hidden memories that visit bought back for us all. I recall Miss Bowden very well and Miss Passey, Miss Elson and her little dog. Do you recall our Art teachers name? So good to hear from you. Do you still live in the region. Carole

      Reply

    • sian May 16, 2016

      Hello, I have seen your comments and we just wondered if the Fred you referred in your posts was related to Lillian Glastonbury?? Any information you have would be great.

      Reply

  21. Carole field October 17, 2015

    I have only just started watching this programme on netfix but was fascinated by it from the start. I was born in Small Heath in Glover Street and went to Tilton Road School from the age of 5 to 16 so know the area well. Moved to Ronald Road Bordesley Green aged five so know Denbeigh Street well and lots of my school friends lived in or just off Garrison Lane. The area is still full of great schools and buildings. Spent many happy hours at Green Lane swimming baths and the library there. Recall the back to backs down cattle road and Maxstoke Street and of course visited the Blues ground often. What very very happy times. Carole

    Reply

  22. Jan murchington September 12, 2015

    We lived in lime grove ,Venetian road in the early 50s My grandmother had a cottage on the tip at the top of venetia road before it was a tip of course. Has anyone got any old photos of venetia or tilton road.my father’s family lived in stilton road ,his dad was Fred B al l. .

    Reply

    • Flos October 18, 2015

      Hi Jan,
      I came across this blog by chance, and noticed your comment about your grandad – Fred Ball. Did he work for Averys, the scale people? I think he might be the chap who married my nan – second marriages for both of them, so no blood relation. Sorry to say, I don’t know much else about him.

      Reply

      • Jan murchington January 1, 2016

        My mother and father and we three girls lived in Venetian grove off garrison lane. I remember all the kids in the road playing together and there where lots of them. The forums,Smith’s my two customs John and Roy Burke who always played football.My grandad was Fred Ball and my Uncle . used to work for Avery Scales we all went to Tilton road school.We used to go to the local baths on the Cov road and strait into the pie shop afterwords.would love to see old photos of this area if anyone has any. Thanks

        Reply

        • Tina Austin June 19, 2016

          Hello Jan,
          I think we may be cousins, Roy Burke is my 2nd cousin, not that I knew him but I do a lot of research on Ancestry. My mom was born and lived in venetia Road and went to Tilton Road School. She is now 87. My mom’s cousin Rose Ball married Edward Burke and they went on to have the two boys John and Roy. My mom’s maiden name was Thompson, first name Joan. My grandmother was Elizabeth Ball 1900-1989. Her brother Frederick Ball 1894-1955.

          Tina.

          Reply

  23. Joe Turvey August 23, 2015

    what great memories of Bordesley green ( DenbighStreet)

    Reply

  24. Sandra Weaver July 28, 2015

    My nan and grandad had a grocers shop the corner of Coventry Road and Watery Lane, number 68 from memory, up until around 1968. Her name was Violet Robinson, she had 7 children and one of the daughters, my aunt Barbara married the green grocers son next door Frank….mr mrs Davies. My dad Peter Fisher worked for a time in the garage in Watery Lane. His mom Mrs Dorothy Fisher had a shop just under the bridge on Bolton Road, and then later to Arthur Street. We were brought up with tales of the old days, but never realised how violent they really were. I also remember the paper shop just before the digbeth flyover….Mr Mrs Bates, there was a pub, betting office and a tat shop.
    I remember being told my Nans brother or father had a pub in the Digbeth area, and one night people came in and shot the place up…..makes my life seem pretty boring!

    Reply

  25. Christine Kendell June 12, 2015

    This is a fascinating piece. I was born, and lived at, 3 Park Villas until I was sixteen.
    One question: where were the Corporation Baths?

    Reply

  26. Barry February 16, 2015

    I lived in Garrison lane no 342 from 1944 till 1950 went to Tilton road school my cousins lived few doors up Ann and Alan Carter , my father was a professional boxer and Trainer Billy Davies he fought Randolph Turpin and was trainer to Johnny Prescott , we moved out to a prefab in Tile Cross , my Grandad and nan also lived in Garrison lane and ran a cafe there they moved on to run the Lights pub in Hospital street just off Summer lane , remember all the back to back houses in both area’s

    Reply

    • peter round February 27, 2016

      Hello Barry.
      You might remember me Peter Round, I was a mate of David kettle who live in Tilton Rd and also mate of Dennis Thomas who live in Tempfeild street.
      Hope to hear from you
      All the best Peter Round

      Reply

  27. Joan hunter, nee Brough February 11, 2015

    Hello I have been reading all the comments which I found so interesting
    I live in Western Australia near Perth ,the last 18 years ,now age 82

    I was born in Cookesy rd small Heath Birmingham ,we moved to Little green Lane , then to Deakins rd south Yardley , my mother , Mrs Laura Brough and her four youngest ,Lily, Raymond then Me Joan and our little sister Doreen ,age four , we went to Red hill School , then evacuated to Evesham ,later to South Wales
    Would any one remember us ?
    Doreen and I had a double wedding ,married in 1953 , my husband Ron Hunter ,sadly passed away
    Lived in Boresley Green, Botha road
    I have not seen this T V series , do hope it comes to W A ?

    Reply

  28. Mandi Docker February 10, 2015

    Hi

    My great grandfather John Docker was a gunsmith and lived in Little Barr Street, is there anyway I can find old photos of that street from around 1900 to 1945? I have been down their in the past few years and I still can see victorian buildings but I would love to see it how my Great Grandfather would have in his time x

    Reply

  29. Denise December 8, 2014

    My Nan and Grand dad used to live in one of the flats on Garrison Lane – from the late 1940’s – 1970 – they were Rose & Bert Tribe – they had two daughters – Shirley and Linda (does any one know them)? my Mom Shirley went to Tilton Road girls school – my mom passed away in January 2012. I’m sure my nan used to work at Rene’s sweet shop. I have fond memories of catching the 61 buzz from Sheldon to the Coventry Road and walking through the back yard to my nan and grandads flat . Peaky blinders bought back happy memories.

    Reply

  30. tony malloy November 11, 2014

    i lived in watery lane at 4/211 from 1954 to 1966 and have found it so interesting and being reminded of all the shops,places and local names i went to ada rd infants and secondary schools and remember school sports days on the blues pitch.my aunt lived in wolsley st so spent a lot of my childhood around garrison lane SO PROUD TO BE FROM SMALL HEATH…

    Reply

  31. susan Foix (mustin) October 18, 2014

    I lived at 4/192 Watery lane in the yard where my nan, two aunties & uncles also lived. In the series Peaky Blinders reference is made to numbers 5 & 6 Watery Lane. Does anyone remember Gaunts sweet shop? I went to St. Andrews school & we had our sports days on the Blues pitch. Dad worked at Hadens for years. Does anyone remember the Mustin family, there were quite a few of us? I absolutely love love love Peaky Blinders.

    Reply

    • Robert August 27, 2015

      Hi Susan, I attended St..Andrews school in 1957/8 and remember you as being the same age or a year younger than me? I also love the Peaky Blinders series and have fond memories of the sports days on the Blues pitch. I lived in Kingston Terrace, off the Coventry Road opposite the bus depot and could see half the blues pitch from my sisters’ bedroom window. The school was on the other side of the railway track that ran alongside our 2 up 2 down terraced house. Your name has been etched on my memory for over 50 + years. I was given a roasting outside the school by your mother and other angry women for chasing you around the playground at break times in your 1st year at school – aged 5?. I was mortified at the time and, as I ran away after seeing your reaction I slipped on the ice and cracked the back of my head on the ground! I didn’t realize at the time how much distress I had caused you until I was confronted by your mother. Seeing your name has given me the opportunity to apologise for my unwanted and upsetting advances toward you. I have fond memories of you but not of my behaviour toward you. It was a learning experience for me that I deserved and my only defence was my age and unruly nature at the time! Kind Regards and Best Wishes. Bob

      Reply

  32. Jayne Grainger October 4, 2014

    Hi, just found this by accident! Very interesting info. I am researching my husbands side and his great grandparents ran a shop 146/148 Garrison Lane for about 20 years 1890 ish to 1911 when I believe the son in law took over. Not coming from that side of town does anyone remember this address and I believe it was just a short way from the Garrison pub (no 110)? Regards jayne

    Reply

    • richard street July 25, 2015

      hi jayne my dad was born at 369 garrison lane my dad is related to the sherlock family as his oldest uncle arthur married into the sherlock family and he did often talk about the shop owned by the sherlock family my dad passed away last year but uncle arthur 2 children are still alive 95 and 92 emily they say it was ahard upbringing around there but many happy memories too !!

      Reply

  33. Paul October 2, 2014

    I used to go to the outdoor at the sided on the late 60’s with my nan when I was younger & living in Garrison Street. She would stand at the hatch with bottles to fill up & she would have a crafty half whilst we were waiting
    I attended St.Andrews school as well up to when I left for Marlborough Juniors happy days
    My Mom worked at Cannings & my Nan worked at Maxstoke street as a cleaner but don’t remember the company she worked for. She would always mention blokes as he’s a blinder & didn’t really know what she meant but now I do
    looking forward to the new series tonight

    Reply

  34. Chris September 27, 2014

    My grandparents were living at 8 Bordesley Street at the end of WW1 when my grandad was demobbed from the army. I see from Google that the house is still standing, next door to a cafe.

    Reply

  35. Hazel September 16, 2014

    Hi, I find this fascinating. My grandparents were born and died in Millward Street Small Heath, My gran at 18 and My granddad at 17. They lived together at 26 after getting married in the early thirties. My mom and her brothers lived there during WW11 and tell many stories of the blitz Blinko was the family name, unusual enough for some to remember perhaps?. My gran remembered the Peaky Blinders, the Sheldons, I think, were in this area. I can remember going to the Betting shop with my granddad just after it became legal. Kids still had to wait outside though, unless you were my granddads granddaughter, then you sat on the counter!

    Reply

  36. Kay Ealing August 23, 2014

    I live in Adelaide , Australia, but born 1950 in Birmingham at Loveday St Maternity Hospital left the UK in 1973. I watch the Peaky Blinders series. I wish I could talk to my Dad about the show, he’s been dead 20 years. he grew up in Small Heath. His name was Howard John Ealing. Birmingham Cityt Football club was his team. He co-owned an Upholstery Business in Bordesley Green called GH Brewer B’Ham LTD. If anyone has any info on my dad or his family let me know. dad born 1907.

    Reply

  37. Mary standley August 16, 2014

    Ray
    I had a brother called Keith and a sister Carol and hazel worked in the garrison with mom after dad died in 1957
    I bet you remember the old piano in the garrison and the nights when they all sang for hours.
    Mom always had the music on and when bits and peices by Dave Clark five was played every one stamped on the floor till she made us take it off, some of the regulars in the 60s where Bernard Warner and Andy capp also the divied between the bars had post cards on the customers had sent very funny ones.
    Also remember Harry hunts greengrocers.
    The people in the day’s then we’re not well off but everyone had time for you, moms up the rd in the wash houses in the lane doing the washing many times running between the lines of pure white sheets in the yards behind odens shop the smell of washing now brings it all back
    Do you remember the pop. Shop with the one armed bandits in on st Andrews rd pop was. Awfull but us kids loved it
    Mary

    Reply

    • Jan Foster August 17, 2014

      Hello Mary – Such memories! We had some good fun, do you remember going to fetch a 6 of chips & eating them under your mom’s kitchen table with a bottle of pop from the pub? & making a den over the bombing? Hope you’re keeping well Jan x

      Reply

  38. Anne Munn July 28, 2014

    Does anyone remember ‘Bassetts Ranch’ on Garrison Lane, owned by George Longbottom, sometimes called Bassett? He was my grandfather, liked to be called Boak, and he was a green grocer. He loved his horses and bare fist boxing! He sold the house on Garrison Lane about 1940.

    Reply

    • peter round February 27, 2016

      Hello Ann.
      I remember the Bassett’s they y live on the corner of SYDNEY RD & Garrison lane also they lived next door to Robert’s the paper shop. And they also had a yard and a stable round in Garrison Street next door to the Queen’s head. I live in the flats in Eastholme.

      Peter round

      Reply

  39. sandra ybert June 21, 2014

    my family on my fathers side The JUKES AND SHERLOCKS AND GEARYS lived in Garrison lane
    my great grand mother was an irish girl she lived and worked at a pub in Garrison lane kate burns
    married george jukes she had 5/6 children off him this is the person who they put into pinky blinders
    dad used to say there was some hard people around I remember going down there to see my step grt grand mother mrs sherlock , there was a tin bath out side every house hung on the wall it was rough
    this was in the late 40s
    the other grt grandmother was emma geary who married george sherlock she died at about 42 leaving my grandmother at 12 to see to her brothers and sister this was in 1902
    her daughter ellen was my grandmother she married leonard jukes when both familys were living on bordesly green in 1914
    my father was born at 28 bordesly green my brother was born in charles rd I was born in Lordswood nursing home harborne because a bomb had hit charles rd the night before
    were my grandfathers did his signwriting and tilton road school next door were my dad went to school its all gone just as though these familys who made birmingham never existed.
    my Uncle who had come for work from south wales in the early 30s to birmingham was cliff coombes
    whos family has prosperd from birmingham he was the uncle of my mother mary stephens who s marraige to my father who owned jukes and curiton advertising in birmingham gave her a good standard of living she came from south wales as well to work in another cousin of her fathers
    off license shop while they had there good jobs in birmingham cliff took her away from that house as the had galloping consumption off there mother who had just died from it
    she was lucky she met dad just at this time 1936 she was 18 and married into a middle class family
    the jukes in 1745 came to birmingham from wolverhamton and dudley our side were button makers
    they made money then went into other trades bsa trains enginers art work brass gun making doctors wifes of solicitrs and the first lord mayor of dudley first heard of in this area after the normans in london essex married into the joselyne family of bourne lincolnshire and hide family
    alice duke married thomas hide about 1430 they were all normans
    thats why john jukes became squire of bordesly 1830s about

    geolagists enamalers

    Reply

    • Patricia Parrish June 1, 2015

      Oh, you’ve just jogged my memory. I used to know Norma Massey who lived at the newsagents in Garrison Lane in the early 1960s. I seem to remember her Dad getting a big American car?

      Reply

      • Denis February 26, 2016

        hello,

        Lived in Barwell rd. from 1943 to 1968.Good memories of Norma.Yea,lovely girl,did live in newspaper shop,next to Hawkins chip shop,Smiths the butchers,Storers grocers and greengrocers with many owners on corner of barwell rd.She married a lad named Dave Jack who i worked with until they moved to Canada, in 1970ish i think. Hope of interest.

        Denis.

        Reply

    • richard street July 25, 2015

      hi sandra my fathers brother married into the sherlock family his name was arthur and his 2 children are still alive 92 and 95 dad was born at 369 garrison lane as was the genaration before him !!

      Reply

    • Nicki Herring September 3, 2015

      My dad was born in Charles Road in 1949 but moved away when he was around 4 or 5. His mother was born on Garrison Lane , I don’t know which number, and the family surname was Huxley. She had an older sister called Ethel born around 1920, nan Gladys was born in 1922, Ivy came next followed by John and Albert, both of whom are still alive and living in the Small Heath area. I have no idea of my great grandparents Christian names but wonder whether anyone remembers the Huxley family. There is also some family connection to Aldous and Julian Huxley, the famous writersand philosophers. Great grandad was a fire warden through WW2 and nan also was in the fire brigade as well as working in a munitions factory. This thread has been so interesting to read and has given me a bit of insight into how my brummie family lived in the 1920s.
      Nicki Herring. Cornwall

      Reply

  40. Mary standley June 19, 2014

    I was born in the garrison tavern in 1953 my mom and dad kept the garrison from about 1952 to 1964 Phil and Fred Glastonbury my memory of the garrison and living there is wonderful l went to garrison lane school then on to tilton rd.
    My best friend was Jan. Who lived In the shop next door Rene’s many happy memories playing in the street while the moms watched us till it got dark. zala’s chippy massy newspaper shop
    53 bus to town lovely times,

    Reply

    • Ray August 11, 2014

      Reading through your blog bought back memories, both my wife and I lived in the area during the 50s early 60s, myself in Gordon St and my wife in Artillery Street. I may have this wrong but did you have a brother, Keith.
      Both Mine and my wife’s Father used to drink in the Garrison. We both went to Garrison Lane Infants, Tilton Rd Junior Schools and then she to Tilton Road Girls and myself to St Andrews Secondary Boys.

      Reply

    • Pauline September 23, 2014

      I remember the shop next door to the Garrison Tavern,I also went to Garrison Lane School,Ada Road and Tilton Road.I was born in 1945.My Nan and Grandad lived in Artillery Street We used to spend hours in the summer holidays playing in Garrison Lane Park.do you remember the ‘parkies hut.On the other side of your shop was the school caretakers house.I have a cracking photo taken in The Garrison of my grandad and my father and two uncles who were in uniform on leave during the war.I hope whoever buys the old pub restores it as it holds so many memories for lots of families

      Reply

    • Christine Kendell June 12, 2015

      We were at infant and junior school together, Mary. I was Christine Maylin.

      Reply

  41. Katrina Meyrick May 27, 2014

    Hi
    I live in Coventry I am researching my family ancestry and I would be interested to know about the following families if you have any information, Turner of Aston Birmingham connection to Birming Small Arms from 1800’s to 1961 My 2 x great uncle Harley Llewelyn Turner was a Brass worker hiis father and sister were Silver smithsin the late 1800’s early 1900’s I am also looking at my Stanton connections and believe there may be a connection to gunsmiths and BSA, They are also connected to Ilkeston Steel works.

    Reply

    • Joe Turner May 30, 2014

      Hi Katrina, thanks for the comment. I don’t think my family has any connections to the Turners you mention – it’s quite a common surname unfortunately!

      The Library of Birmingham has a good family history service if you haven’t tried already: http://www.birmingham.gov.uk/genealogy

      Good luck with the research!

      Reply

      • Sandra May 30, 2014

        Hi Joe, what a brilliant blog!! After researching my Wilson family history who lived around the area of Ladywood . My G.G.Grandmother Martha Wilson married an Alfred Lee in 1867, he being a Metal Roller of Fazeley Street, but born in Leicestershire
        In 1871 they were living at 17 Derby Street, Deritend, Aston
        In 1881 they were living at 13 Montague Street, Deritend, Aston
        By 1901 they were living apart, he in Icknield Square, Ladywood and she at 34 Montague Street, Duddeston, Aston.
        After 1901 it looks like Alfred Lee died (TBC) and his family are using the surname Wilson. Were they hiding something or perhaps it wassomething to do with a ‘will’ ?

        It makes me wonder how much of the names in the storyline are indeed fictional or could they have been actual names?

        Reply

  42. Bob Danks May 23, 2014

    Live in Australia (moved her from Brum in 1968) so yet to see the show but very much looking forward to it. My brother together with my parents lived in Garrison Lane when he was very young in the 1930s before moving to Cooksey Road in Small Heath and then were bombed out in the early forties and moved to Sheldon where I was born. I was a cop working out of Edward Road and Balsall Heath Road nicks in 1966-1968 and did a lot of beat work around St Andrews especially on match day so the photos brought back a lot of memories. The shot of the viaduct was a real flashback and brought a tear to my eye. Still proud to be a Brummie and an avid Blues fan. You can take the boy out of Birmingham but you can’t take Birmingham out of the boy. The grand kids reckon I “talk funny”. Go figure.

    Reply

    • Joe Turner May 23, 2014

      Thanks Bob – glad to hear this brought back memories for you. The ‘Bordesley Cattle Station’ sign on the viaduct is still there, although partly covered by some other signs at the moment. Keep Right On!

      Reply

  43. Anne May 17, 2014

    I’m researching my family tree. My great grandmother lived at 208 Watery Lane in 1901, in fact my grandfather was born at this address in 1903. He was illegitimate, as was his sister so my great grandmother had 2 children out of wedlock by the age of 20. Apparently their dad was irish and collected money for unpaid loans. My grandad hated him because he once saw him nearly beat a man to death for not paying his loan and rumour has it he was hung for murder. Im still researching but the Peaky Blinders existed at this time, far earlier than the programme depicts. But the programme made me realise how hard his life must have been.

    Reply

  44. Shelly Reynolds January 5, 2014

    I have never watched peaky blinders but had a conversation in pub with someone New Year’s Day my mom and dad Anne and John Reynolds kept the Garrison I think between 1968 and 1971. I started school at Tilton Road and although very young have some really good memories of the pub .I went to Green Lane nursery. I also remember the local shop next door not sure what actual name was but we called it Reenies.

    Reply

    • Jan Foster March 14, 2014

      I enjoyed the peaky blinders and I think a second series is being filmed. Talking of the Garrison pub – I lived in the shop situated between the Garrison and the Nursery school (which I attended) We lived there from about 1957 until 1971 and yes my Mom’s name was Rene!

      Reply

  45. Les Rose November 18, 2013

    Now living in Australia, I have yet to see the series, but I have fond memories of probably some of the best years of my life. Being born at 8/208 Watery lane (yes I still remember the address) 1 living area down stairs, and 2 very small bedrooms upstairs.Living next door to my oldest mate Gary (spud) Taylor, we both attended St Andrews school, and are still both devoted City fans. I can recall we once had our school sports day at the ground, winning the egg & spoon race, we still remain friends up to this day. My late mother Violet Knight once told me (herself the last of 13 children living next door to the Anchor pub (2 bedrooms, but they had a little yard, I guess you could call them posh by todays standards, next to the canal),of the time my grandfather (Curly Knight) as he was known, a modern Rag & Bone man with the luxury of a horse & cart t`boot. Well as the story goes, Curly would often stagger out of the Anchor, and instead of turning left, would turn right, and yes you guessed it, fell into the canal, on more than one occassion. Just one of probably a host of memberable stories that associate itself with life Small Heath. Anyone else got a story to tell? Cannot wait for the series to be aired here, might see my old grandad

    Reply

  46. Andy Smart October 27, 2013

    Loved this article Joe and especially enjoyed the photos. I’d love you to do a piece on Digbeth some time!

    Reply

    • Joe Turner October 28, 2013

      Cheers Andy. Digbeth is definitely on the list!

      Reply

    • Marlene January 17, 2015

      I was born in Watery Lane and have loved reading all the comments left by people. I remember the Mustins of Watery Lane, I was a friend of Sheila Panter (cousin to Susan). I vaguely remember the name Les Rose and Alan Taylor – did you live up the same yard as the Cotton’s? I think Elsie Randall lived in the house at the bottom of the entry……so many names jump into my head……so many people in such a tiny lane. I could name many, many more but will refrain from doing so. I attended St Andrew’s Primary School and also had the pleasure of sports day at the Blues ground. Peaky Blinders has evoked emotional nostalgia in those that lived in the area and given a thumbs up to being a Brummie!

      Reply

      • Don Hoccom July 9, 2015

        Hi Marlene, seem to remember you, I think we were at school together.
        My gran lived in Watery lane, but we lived at St Andrews Church.

        Reply

  47. TONY CHAPMAN October 25, 2013

    My granddad Bert Price was born and bread in garrison lane a went of to the great war,i rember hime telling me all the old tails from there when he came back from france,all these guys and how he used to box down there some times bear fist.I rel gentleman he used to take me down there when I was a youg biy in the sixties and spoke of the aPeaky bliders.I loved the show.

    Reply

  48. Matthew O'Sullivan October 23, 2013

    Born in small Heath of Irish parents who at one stage owned the wagon and horses on adderley st. So as a kid I roamed that whole area the program bought back memories and made me take a look back at my own history nice blog btw.

    Reply

    • Joe Turner October 24, 2013

      Matthew, thanks. My picture of the Wagon & Horses narrowly missed the cut for this blog. Can send it to you if you’re interested?

      Thanks to everyone for all your memories and stories – it’s great to know people are interested in the area and in Birmingham’s history.

      Reply

  49. Keith Bracey October 16, 2013

    The Peaky Blinders is a brilliant series and so well realised…..who could imagine that Small Heath and Bordesley Green could be so glamorous….still I suppose there was once a ‘Green’ in Bordesley…after all there is the major thoroughfare Green Lane in Small Heath….

    I used to get the Sandon Road Number 6 Corporation ‘Buzz’ into townand then the number 16 down Green Lane, and I got off near Hobmoor Road to walk to my gillfriend Alexandra Victoria Hollis’s house at 200 Floyer Road in Small Heath. her mom Maria Hollis, would be in her 80’s now. She was Eurasian and had a German father and Siamese Mother. Vicky’s Dad, George Hollis met Maria in Bangkok on r and r with Brummie General William ‘Bill’ Slim’s ‘Forgotten Army’ of Brummie and Indian troops which at the battles of Imphal and Kohima in 1945 saved the Indian Empire from the same fate as Singapore in 1941.

    George Hollis and Maria Seidel fell in love and married in Bangkok and George brought Maria the child bride and soldier’s sweetheart back to the cold and the hostility and the rampant racism of a post-war Birmingham….

    Maria always said she used to watch the washer-women gossiping about her and her mixed-race family on their Floyer Road Doosteps…..

    The number 6 ‘buzz’ went from the top of Willow Avenue in Bearwood, where the it had its terminus next to a branch of the Birmingham Municipal Bank, which enabled me Mom and Dad Dot and Les Bracey (from Summer Lane, Aston)…

    Me mom Dorothy was born Dot Merriman. and lived in back-to-backs in Dugdale Street, off the Dudley Road in Winson Green.

    Her Dad, me Grandad Arthur Lewis Merriman worked at Hudson and Wright, also in Dugdale Street and drank at The Park Tavern on the corner of Dugdale Street and Dudley Road and at ‘The Engine’ AKA ‘The Locomotive’ next to the entrance to Cape Hill Brewery and ‘The Yorkshire Grey’ further up the Dudley Road, near to where those 3 poor young Muslim boys were run over and killed during the Birmingham Riots, and the father of two of the unfortunate victims, Tariq Jahan, showed what true Brummie Spirit and Community is all about………………

    Grandad Arthur was in the Auxiliary Fire Service at the Cape Hill Brewery Fire Station and was often out on fire watch during the Birmingham Blitz of 1941 with his bucket of water and stirrup pump….he volunteered in 1939 but at 40 was too old….he had been a teenage soldier in The Black Watch during The Great War…..brave men all!

    Keith Bracey, Birmingham Community Historian, Greensward Enterprise, Oldbury, West Midlands.

    Reply

  50. Jackie October 16, 2013

    we lived in Grey Street, I was born there, Sportsmans was on the corner of the road, went to nursery at Garrson Lane nursery and first went to school at Tilton Road. Used to mind the cars for the Blues fans on a Saturday for 3d a car, my nan and auntie also lived in Grey St, many memories of there.

    Reply

  51. wendy rainey October 16, 2013

    i lived in gordon st when i was a child in the 60s but nobody has any photos ! i remember the house very well , old victorian house 🙂

    Reply

    • thomas October 15, 2014

      god gordon street great place

      Reply

  52. Lily Daniels October 16, 2013

    My dad was born in 1884 so was old enough to know of the peaky blinders. He told me. The bookies would pay men to take bets in the streets as it was illegal. When the men were arrested. The peaky blinder bookie. Would pay his court fine and move him to another area. They were men home from the First World War. No job and no money. They were only paid. Two weeks money on being demobbed. Being a bookies runner was all that was on offer to them

    Reply

    • Dorothy Fairfield January 31, 2015

      I’ve watched Peaky Blinders – excellent and very atmospheric. My paternal grandfather worked as a bedstead maker, but was also a ‘bookies’ runner’. My grandmother told me how he would come home, late evenings, bringing his bookie friends. He would never answer the front door, leaving that to any of the family who happened to be in, and if it was the police at the door, he would race out of the back door and ‘disappear’ for an hour or so.

      Reply

    • Dorothy Fairfield January 31, 2015

      I forgot to mention that the family lived in Denbigh Street, Bordesley Green. My mother’s family lived in Small Heath, also involved with the Peaky Blinders.

      Reply

  53. Pauline October 5, 2013

    Love this blog,This area of Birmingham often gets overrlooked ,I lived in Fazeley Street until I was 16 and in my mind I can still picture all the streets,buildings,and people who lived in the area during the 1950s 1960s My grandparents lived in Artillery Street ,just off Garrison Lane,the Garrison,Sportsmans,and the Sailors Return pubs where some of grandads locals.Both myself and my brother went to Garrison Lane,Ada Road and Tilton Roads schools and of course Blues supporters.There was a large mix of people in the area,quite a big Italian community,also there was a canal basin and warehouses in Fazeley street you can see the building from the train it is shaped like a barge,some of the bargees would come to the local shops to stock up before they set off on there next trip.There a lot of ‘local characters’ who lived around this area years ago ,not always law abiding but would help any-one out if they where in need.Happy Days !!

    Reply

    • Sandra McDiarmid-James October 10, 2013

      Not hooked after first episode due to awful accents. Series began in the year of my mothers birth 1919. I doubted the horrors of the opening scenes was it really that bad?

      I was born in Maxstoke Street a stones throw from Watery Lane and the Garrison Pub and the even closer Sportsman, my dad’s local. Despite the poverty, not recognised at the time, the community spirit was amazing. When death occurred women would trawl the neighbourhood to collect for the widow and her family.
      My memories are varied of the years 1945-1965 the year I left. I could not wait to escape. Only on leaving did I begin to understand ‘community and neighbourly support’.

      I got well and truly hooked by second and subsequent episodes. I ask myself why I have endeavoured to rid myself of the accent so ridiculed by adverts and across the UK often represented as numpties.

      The actors involved in the series should be applauded, the writer acknowledged for his brilliance and the set designers for their attention to detail.

      Loved the reference to the St Andrews bell, the school I attended and the church I married in.

      I watch this in my present abode ‘a million miles’ away but it has rekindled many, many fond memories of my time in Small Heath.

      Sincere thanks to all those involved in this superb series.

      Reply

      • Pauline October 24, 2013

        I remember you Sandra from schooldays, we were in the same class through Infant and Junior School at what was then Ada Road later renamed St.Andrews

        Reply

  54. Joe Turner September 24, 2013

    Both, thanks very much for your kind comments.

    Clare, I was wondering the same – perhaps it was the men doing all the drinking?! And don’t be too put off by the accents.

    Rporlddavies, I agree – it is great to step back and think about the history around us. I’ve walked past a couple of the buildings here many without giving them a second thought. Perhaps it takes a TV show from outside the city to make us appreciate what we have.

    Reply

  55. rporldavies September 23, 2013

    I have always been saddened by Birmingham’s inability to tell its own vibrant story. It is fascinating. PB’s finest contribution may well be to get people to open their eyes to what is around them and then check out some history for themselves.

    A very well written and enthusiastic blog–very enjoyable.

    Reply

  56. Clare Overton Lewis September 23, 2013

    Really enjoyed your blog post, Joe. LOVED the photos!! I must admit I haven’t caught up with the series yet but am intrigued, though I know many have been put off by dodgy accents. I regularly catch the 97 bus through Bordesley Green and have always loved the architecture on the stretch into the city centre. I’ve walked down to the gentlemen’s toilets under the railway bridge to see if there was any kind of female equivalent. What DID women do back then?

    Reply

  57. Joe Turner September 23, 2013

    Thanks everyone for your positive comments and stories.

    @ Louse / Suzi – do be careful, some of the bits on the canal are quite lonely!

    @ Nichola – judging by the Gangs of Birmingham book, the Peaky Blinders the Summer Lane / Gun Quarter youths would have been a match for the Peaky Blinders

    Reply

  58. Nichola Balmer September 23, 2013

    Nice blog Joe! :o)) My Mom lived in backs to backs in Summer Lane so not quite PB territory, byt hey!

    Reply

  59. John C September 23, 2013

    Terrific stuff.

    My grandfather lived in Miles Street( now gone) the other side of the Ibis roundabout from Watery Lane,and from 1903 – 1938,and he told me about the Peaky Blinders.

    I am loving the series so far, despite the accents.

    Reply

  60. Suzi September 23, 2013

    I lived in Small Heath until i was 8years old…….in a back-to-back…the accent does grate on me, but it is a very good series……Louise maybe we can take a walk down the street where your Nan lived when a child?

    Reply

  61. Louise September 23, 2013

    Brilliant blog. I’m going to take the walk to see it all.

    Reply

  62. Richard Dunne September 23, 2013

    Great article/blog. I read the sloggers and Peaky Blinders book well in advance of the TV series, and was a bit apprehensive as to how the TV portrayal would work. We all have our own images and ideas of how it should look, but I must admit the ‘Filmic ‘qualities has elevated it to an incredible high standard and puts Birminghams social History firmly on the map where it belongs to those on a local and dare I say national international basis. My dad was a Policeman in Birmingham in the late 1940’s and would have been familiar with the areas and no doubt remnants of the families who had ties with the past gangs. Hard times for all.

    Reply

  63. Katie September 23, 2013

    Fascinating article and a great selection of photos.

    Reply

  64. Suze September 23, 2013

    An absolutely blinding first blog for BCT Joe. I will pay more attention watching the series tomorrow night!

    Reply

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